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When you look into Zeus’s eyes, you feel like you’re staring into the galaxy. Zeus cannot see and is blind, but his “useless” eyes bring some to tears with their beauty and magic. According to Inner Splendor, “When a man found this injured owl, he took him to the Wildlife Learning Center in Sylmar, California and discovered that he is a Western Screech Owl. “

Zeus was named after the Greek God of sky and thunder because of his starry eyes. Because of his blindness, he couldn’t be released back into the wild and has a forever home at the Wild Life Learning Center in Los Angles, CA.

Owls’ eyes are actually really important and make up 1-5% of their body weight. According to Mystical Raven, the wildlife team says, “In our combined 40-plus-years of working with wildlife, we’ve never seen anything quite like it. But he’s doing great! He still hangs out in the office with us every day and is otherwise completely healthy.”

The owl’s galaxy eyes are caused by protein clots and blood pigment paired with cataracts. While no one knows what caused the clots and cataracts, it’s suspected Zeus was attacked by a predator or involved in a flying accident.

In some Native American tribes, there are people who believe that owls carry messages from beyond the grave or deliver supernatural warnings to people. Other ancient civilizations believed owls served as the messengers and companions of the gods of death.

If more owls looked like Zeus, perhaps more civilizations in the modern world would believe the same. Zeus truly seems mystical with eyes that mirror the galaxy.

Zeus’s eyes are so impactful on people, he’s got a fan club of artists who draw him and depict him in various ways.

Here are some of our favorite depictions of the owl with cosmic eyes

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